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Phi Beta Kappa

Phi Beta Kappa

Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest and most respected undergraduate honors organization in the United States. The Society has pursued its mission of fostering and recognizing excellence in the liberal arts and sciences since 1776.

Phi Beta Kappa sets high standards not only for the selection of students elected to membership but also for the institutions which may claim a chapter. Chapters are granted to the Phi Beta Kappa members of the faculty and administration of the sheltering institution. Following a lengthy process of documentation by the Phi Beta Kappa members of the faculty and administrative staff, the University of Dallas was chartered as the Eta Chapter of Texas in 1989.

Each year, the resident members of the chapter elect new members from among those senior and junior undergraduate students majoring in liberal arts and sciences who have demonstrated broad cultural interests, scholarly achievement, and good character. Occasionally, graduate and faculty members are elected as well. These newly-elected members are inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa Society at a ceremony held shortly before the spring graduation.

Click here to learn more about why Phi Beta Kappa matters when choosing a college.

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