Capitoline Wolf

Art & Architecture

The ancients said that all roads lead to Rome and University of Dallas students are proof that the maxim holds true. Why is this the case? What is it about Rome that draws the viewer, the spectator, the student, the tourist, the expatriate, and the pilgrim? Why did the ancients believe that all thoroughfares terminated at the place where the Tiber River bends? Why did the medieval Romans believe that they lived in the Eternal City? Why did Renaissance Romans strive so valiantly to revive ancient arts and knowledge? How have past and present been intricately entwined to produce one of the contemporary world's most fascinating cities?

These questions are the subject of ART 2311: Art and Architecture in Rome, a course offered each semester on the University of Dallas Rome campus and designed to help students understand both the present-day city in which they spend their semester and Rome of the past. Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque and Modern Rome are the subjects of this course.

The class meets twice a week: once each week it meets in the classroom to discuss broad historical trends that provide the context for Rome's monuments of art and architecture, and once a week students go to Rome to exercise art historical methodologies in local museums, churches, and archaeological sites.

Among the sites often visited as part of this course are the following:

The Roman Forum

The Capitoline Museums

The Colosseum

The Ara Pacis

The National Archaeological Museum at the Palazzo Massimo

The Church of San Clemente

The Tempietto

The Galleria Borghese

The Churches of Santa Maria della Vittoria, San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, and Sant'Andrea al Quirinale

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