American Studies

At its founding America created a new political order, one dedicated to fostering a life of ordered liberty in accord with “laws of Nature and Nature’s God.” 

Novel though it was, the project thus begun has sought to realize conceptions of the best life for human beings as that understanding has emerged over the course of Western civilization. Coming to grasp and to assess that project requires investigating a tradition of thought and experience extending far back in time, a tradition that has been transmitted through works of moral and political philosophy, through imaginative literature and from historical experience of statesmanship, revolution, and constitution making. 

Customize a program of study integrating American literature, politics and history, and investigate the authentic understanding of human nature, political order and justice shared by America's founders. Gain distinctive preparation for a career in teaching, public policy or research.  

Consider America's revolutionary enterprise. 

The Master’s program in American Studies provides opportunity to consider Americans’ revolutionary enterprise in the light of precedents extending back to classical antiquity. It investigates the understanding of human nature, political order and justice underlying American institutions through the study of political philosophers, European and American statesmen and imaginative writers of the Old World as well as the New. Master’s candidates will also examine challenges to those ideas posed by dissenters resulting in transformation of some of those institutions with the Civil War and in recent times. Students will compare the present self-understanding of Americans with earlier expressions of self-definition in an effort to reestablish connections between this nation’s self-understanding and a Western tradition that has drawn guidance from reason, biblical revelation, and aspirations toward responsible freedom.

Learn about Clare Rindone's experience.


2018 Galbraith Lecture Explores 'Dante and Liturgical Time'

As we age, most of us ask ourselves, where has the time gone? Borrowing text from UD's Core curriculum, this spring semester's Galbraith Lecture will explore the difference between our own perception of time, and how the philosopher-poet Dante Alighieri viewed mankind's immortal clock, steeped in Scripture and in life.

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UD Presents: 'Dwelling: Paintings by Peter Ligon and Layla Luna'

The Beatrice M. Haggerty Gallery is pleased to announce an upcoming exhibition featuring two Dallas/Fort Worth area artists, Peter Ligon and Layla Luna, who articulate the architectural styling of dwelling spaces in their paintings. Both artists will give presentations at an opening reception on Friday, March 23, at 5:30 p.m. in the Haggar Art History Auditorium located in the Haggerty Art Village on the University of Dallas’ Irving campus.

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Politics Major Empowers Youth, Shares Story Through Theater

Although she herself is not able to vote, Liz Magallanes, BA '18, works to make voting possible for other people. She first got involved with the organization Mi Familia Vota in 2014 and has been contributing to their endeavors ever since, including working with high school students in Dallas ISD. Additionally, she recently had a role in the play "Deferred Action."

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