Ramify Journal

Read the ongoing dialogue within the Western tradition from the perspective of the Braniff Graduate School. 

Ramify is the journal of the Braniff Graduate School of Liberal Arts. It is intended to reflect the unique intellectual atmosphere of our graduate programs. It is therefore multi-disciplinary, and publishes serious but jargon-free intellectual treatments on topics of humane interest. The journal seeks to foster the involvement of scholars, teachers, and students in the ongoing dialogue within the Western tradition. 

A journal written by students and for all. 

Ramify coverRamify is edited by Braniff graduate students; Braniff faculty members provide oversight in order to maintain a high standard of scholarship. Each issue highlights several essays from Braniff graduate students, and also includes an essay from an 'outside scholar' and one from a University of Dallas faculty member. In order to foster scholarly work in the language arts, Ramify also publishes artistic translations of literary works.

While focused on great works within the Western tradition, Ramify remains engaged with the broader academic community. And, while respectful of our tradition, our outlook is exploratory, interpretive, and broad. For further information, including subscription and submission information, please visit our website at www.ramify.org or email our editors at editors@ramify.org.

Donations to support Ramify can be mailed to the following address:

Ramify Donations
University of Dallas Box 882
1845 E Northgate Dr.
Irving TX 75062

News

Dignifying Humanity

Standing on the edge of border America, Diocese of El Paso Bishop Mark J. Seitz, BA '76, serves a role of vital importance as the pastor of a community divided by the United States-Mexico border. "Recently we have witnessed indefensible, hateful words toward our neighbors in Mexico, the demonization of migrants, and destructive language about our border," Seitz wrote in his July pastoral letter titled "Sorrow and Mourning Flee Away," earning him national attention amid significant upheaval of immigration rights.

+ Read More

The Rome Experience: Tracing Western Civilization

During this semester's trip to Greece, UD's Romers toured the ruins of one of history's most famous military engagements -- the Battle of Marathon -- dating back to 490 B.C. The trip marked the first visit to Marathon in decades for the Rome Program. "Our visit there was long overdue," said Peter Hatlie, vice president, dean, director, and professor of classics on the Rome campus.

+ Read More