Dallas Medieval Texts and Translations

Dallas Medieval Texts and Translations

Dallas Medieval Texts and Translations

Launched in 2002, the Dallas Medieval Texts and Translations series is engaged in an ambitious long-term project: to build a library of medieval Latin texts, with English translations, from the period roughly between 500 and 1500, which will represent the whole breadth and variety of medieval civilization. Thus, the series is open to all subjects and genres, ranging from poetry and history through philosophy, theology, and rhetoric to treatises on natural science. It will include, as well, medieval Latin versions of Arabic and Hebrew works. Placing these texts side by side, rather than dividing them in terms of the boundaries of contemporary academic disciplines, will, it is hoped, contribute to a better understanding of the complex coherence and interrelatedness of the many facets of medieval written culture.

Dallas Medieval Texts and Translations is made possible through a transatlantic collaboration between the University of Dallas, which houses the editorial offices of the series, and Peeters of Louvain, which produces it in handsome volumes that are designed to last.

As of June 2013, nineteen volumes have been published; about twenty more are under contract.

For more information, please go to www.dallasmedievaltexts.org.

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