Undergraduate Concentrations

Undergraduate Concentrations

Electives available in a student’s program provide opportunities to pursue new or deepen previous studies according to the student’s inclinations. They are not required.

A "concentration" is a set of courses that enables students to use electives to achieve disciplined study in an area short of a major.

Generally, concentrations are a coherent set of four to six courses in areas appropriate to liberal arts education but not available as an undergraduate major; composed of courses that already exist at the university; have a specific faculty advisor; and are identified as a concentration in the catalog and on the transcript.

At least three courses (9 credit hours), in any concentration must be at the advanced level; a grade of at least C- must be earned. In certain cases, courses may be double-counted. 

Undergraduate concentrations include:

Accounting

American Politics

Applied Mathematics

Applied Physics

Art - Art History

Art - Studio Art

Biblical Greek

Biopsychology

Business

Christian Contemplative Tradition

Comparative Literary Traditions

Computer Science

Drama

Education

Environmental Science

Ethics

Healthcare Business

History and Philosophy of Science

Human Sciences and the Contemporary World

Industrial/Organizational Psychology

International Studies

Jewish Studies

Journalism

Language and Area Studies

Latin American Studies

Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Molecular Biology

Music

Pastoral Ministry

Political Philosophy

Pure Mathematics

 

News

You Can Do What with a (Spanish) Degree?

His first step was to enroll in physician’s assistant school at Baylor’s College of Medicine, a career trajectory to which he had aspired since his early childhood. Nowadays, Jonathan Cunningham, BA ’17, is dedicated to the vocational pursuit of comfort and healing at MD Anderson in Houston, among the largest cancer treatment centers in the U.S., where he was once a chemotherapy patient himself.

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History Alumnus Heads National Catholic Bioethics Center

During his Rome semester in 1991, Joseph Meaney, BA '93, with his friends (now Father) Kevin Cook, BA '94, and (now Texas State Representative and UD Trustee) Tan Parker, BA '93, attended a private Mass with Pope St. John Paul II. Several weeks earlier, they had hand-delivered a letter to the Swiss Guards outside St. Peter's requesting the Mass and including their contact information; at last, they'd received the phone call instructing them to be at the Bronze Gates at 5 a.m.

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