Human Sciences in the Contemporary World provides excellent preparation for careers that demand intellectual independence, research skills, and the ability to combine detailed analysis with an integrating vision. The skills and knowledge acquired regarding cultural practices, social structures, and forms and aspects of the contemporary world would be highly appropriate for anyone who plans to go into medicine, public health, law, government, business, journalism, consulting, social work, international development and NGOs, or any other field demanding an articulate grasp of life in a globalizing environment (e.g., market research for a major corporation or program evaluation for social justice initiatives). Students of the B.A. program who are interested in pursuing graduate degrees will be well prepared for study in the social sciences and in many humanities disciplines as well.

Recent graduates have found employment or graduate studies immediately upon graduating as:

  • Community Engagement Coordinator for non-profit (Washington, D.C.)
  • Mentor to at-risk youths for non-profit (San Antonio, TX)
  • Graduate student in physical therapy program
  • Data Analyst for marketing research firm (San Antonio, TX)
  • English teacher (China)


Comparative evaluation of career opportunities for STEM, humanities, and social sciences

But can you get a job if you major in the Human Sciences? These days, doesn't everyone say that you need to major in one of the STEM fields (sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics) to get a good job after college?

The immediate employment opportunities for STEM majors, right out of college, is marginally better than for the humanities and the social sciences, and initial salaries are somewhat higher. But when you look to the longer term, the facts can be downright surprising.

In May 2015, the British Council published the results of a study it did jointly with Ipsos Public Affairs. Ipsos is an international corporation based in Paris that does global market research, and the British Council is the United Kingdom's international organization for spreading the English language and developing cultural relations and educational opportunities in more than 100 countries. The study involved people in 30 countries, including the U.K. and the U.S.A. What they wanted to find out was what the higher-education pathway looked like for leaders in all professions, public and private, in those countries.

The first two of their major findings are that (1) the majority of people identified as leaders have degrees in the social sciences and humanities and (2) young, rising professional leaders even more strongly prefer degrees in those fields. Here are some of the numbers: 55% of all professional leaders hold undergraduate degrees in the social sciences or the humanities (44% social sciences, 11% humanities), with the next two largest groupings being business (14%) and engineering (12%). Among professional leaders younger than age 45 there is an even stronger representation of undergraduate degrees in the social sciences and the humanities: 58% for younger leaders, 51% for older ones.

This is just one study, of course. But the results do harmonize with some other studies that have been done over the years. In particular, AT&T found, by following the careers of its employees over the long term, that employees with humanities and social sciences degrees tended with the passage of time to rise higher in the corporation than those with technical degrees. This of course does not mean that every human sciences major will surpass every science, business, or engineering major! But it should help ease your mind about future prospects if Human Sciences in the Contemporary World turns out to be the major for you.

If you want to pursue the Human Sciences, which at UD is interdisciplinary in the social sciences but also draws on relevant humanities disciplines and the biological sciences, you have reason to be encouraged. In fact you have two reasons. The first is what the British Council study implies: that the social sciences and the humanities are not an employment dead end, but a pathway to success. The second is that if you are a Human Sciences major at the University of Dallas, you will learn how to conduct studies like the British Council/Ipsos survey, you will learn how to evaluate and interpret the results, and you will be able to suggest new ways and new studies that would refine and make more accurate the results of previous work. You will also have a strong foundation in the conceptual underpinnings of past and contemporary social sciences, not to mention the breadth of vision spurred by the University of Dallas Core Curriculum. You will have learned how to read closely and speak and write with persuasive attention to detail. You will have learned how to work closely and cooperatively with faculty and fellow students. Precisely those talents make you very professionally valuable in the contemporary world.



2018 Galbraith Lecture Explores 'Dante and Liturgical Time'

As we age, most of us ask ourselves, where has the time gone? Borrowing text from UD's Core curriculum, this spring semester's Galbraith Lecture will explore the difference between our own perception of time, and how the philosopher-poet Dante Alighieri viewed mankind's immortal clock, steeped in Scripture and in life.

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UD Presents: 'Dwelling: Paintings by Peter Ligon and Layla Luna'

The Beatrice M. Haggerty Gallery is pleased to announce an upcoming exhibition featuring two Dallas/Fort Worth area artists, Peter Ligon and Layla Luna, who articulate the architectural styling of dwelling spaces in their paintings. Both artists will give presentations at an opening reception on Friday, March 23, at 5:30 p.m. in the Haggar Art History Auditorium located in the Haggerty Art Village on the University of Dallas’ Irving campus.

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Politics Major Empowers Youth, Shares Story Through Theater

Although she herself is not able to vote, Liz Magallanes, BA '18, works to make voting possible for other people. She first got involved with the organization Mi Familia Vota in 2014 and has been contributing to their endeavors ever since, including working with high school students in Dallas ISD. Additionally, she recently had a role in the play "Deferred Action."

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