Concentration Requirements

The Concentration

Historically, the human sciences emerged as traditional cultures were turning modern. One of their central concerns has therefore been the problems of negotiating this transition.

This makes them indispensable for understanding human existence in the contemporary world. 

Concentrators in the program learn to apply the theories and concepts of the human and social sciences to problems of contemporary societies. The skills and knowledge acquired regarding cultural practices, social structures and forms and aspects of the contemporary world are useful for anyone planning to go into law, government, business, journalism, graduate studies in the social sciences, or any other field demanding an articulate grasp of life in a globalizing environment.

A student electing the Human and Social Sciences concentration will take (1) HUSC 3331: Conceptual Foundations of the Human Sciences, and (2) at least three other three-hour HUSC courses, two of which must be numbered 3000 or higher and two of which must be among those required of the major.

Human and Social Sciences Courses

  • HUSC 2301. The World in the Twenty-First Century.
  • HUSC 2311. Introduction to the Social Sciences.
  • HUSC 3311. The Arts in Contemporary Cultures.
  • HUSC 3312. Science, Technology and Society.
  • HUSC 3331. Conceptual Foundations of the Human Sciences.
  • HUSC 3334. Philosophical Anthropology of the Contemporary World.
  • HUSC 4341. Tradition and Innovation

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