Concentration

Concentration

A Concentration in French, German, Italian or Spanish consists of four courses (twelve credits) in a single language/ literature at the advanced level (3000 or above).

For one of the four courses it is possible to substitute:

a) an advanced course in a second language/ literature/ history;
b) two lower-division courses in a second language/ literature;
c) an advanced course in a disciplinary approach to language in general. For this purpose, the following courses are acceptable:

EDU 5354. Language Acquisition/ Linguistics
MCT 3330. Historical Linguistics
PHI 4335. Philosophy of Language
PSY 3334. Psychology of Language and Expression

For any other substitutions, the approval of the coordinator is needed.

The student wishing to concentrate in a language should consult with the coordinator no later than the Junior year and declare the concentration in the Registrar's Office.

How to Declare a Language Concentration

You declare your intention to concentrate by going to see the Language Concentration Coordinator, Jacob-Ivan Eidt, in person in his office, Anselm 108. Going to see the Coordinator can be useful for two other reasons as well: 1) He can (and in some cases will) approve course substitutions; 2) he can answer some of your questions.

For questions about what language courses are best suited for you, please contact Dr. Eidt.

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