Reading Group

HPS Faculty Reading Group

Each semester UD faculty meet weekly to discuss the theories, methods and achievements of the natural and human sciences and mathematics. The fall semester is dedicated to books by leading scientists about their own research areas. In the spring, discussion focuses on the historical, philosophical, theological, and social dimensions of science. Another, less formal reading group meets two or three times each summer, discussing a different book at each meeting.

Check out our current reading schedule, books we've read in the past, and related book recommendations from UD professors. Note that each of the books we read is the subject of lively disagreements, and is not necessarily endorsed by the University of Dallas!

News

Alumni Reimagine Education for Boys

Peter Searby, BA '01, feels that modern schools -- with a scarcity of opportunities for children to work with their hands and use their imaginations to explore their worlds -- are doing boys in particular a disservice. From this recognized deficiency, Searby conceived the idea for Riverside Center for Imaginative Learning. Also finding the education of boys to be a primary concern, Daniel Kerr, BA '03, opened St. Martin's Academy, a Catholic boys' boarding high school in Fort Scott, Kansas, in 2018.

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Crowley Trio: An Evening of Beauty

In an intimate gathering at the Museum of Biblical Art in February, UD celebrated the inaugural Crowley Chamber Trio Concert, "Music in the Museum," the first of three concerts that took place this spring. The opening performance rekindled the university's popular Crowley concerts, which first took breath more than two decades ago.

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Professor Applies Lessons Learned from Autistic Sons to All Life

Former Affiliate Assistant Professor of Spanish Nicole (Hammerschmidt) Lasswell, BA '03, and her husband, Martin, have two sons, Will and Stevie, both of whom have autism. For World Autism Awareness Day, the family was interviewed on Telemundo; because the boys are thriving, it seemed particularly important to the Lasswells to share their story and their hope with others.

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