Alumna Makes Cutting Edge Science Accessible to the Public

Alumna Makes Cutting Edge Science Accessible to the Public

Jessica NimonWhen Jessica Nimon, M.A. '03, thought of being a writer she imagined working at a fashion magazine and went on to study both English and photography. As a UD undergraduate, she worked for the University News, read all of Fr. Maguire's 'F revisable to A' comments on her papers and took photographs of the spring 1998 Rome semester. By the time she graduated with a master's degree in English, however, she had chosen Persuasion as her favorite novel, writing over photography, and her future as a communicator had moved far beyond fashion to the stars.

Now, after years as a NASA technical writer and editor, Nimon is a research communications specialist for the International Space Station Program Science Office, communicating science performed on the Space Station, which, like UD's curriculum, is cross-disciplinary. She, as a bridge builder from the Space Station to the nations below, believes in her work to explain the station's research discoveries and benefits for humanity.

"I believe my writing skills and the liberal arts education I received at UD have given me the ability to help NASA engineers articulate important technical information about their designs," said Nimon. "While they are all exceptionally well educated, most do not have the background in written communication that is needed to make their cutting edge science accessible to the public."

Samples of Nimon's work are available on one of NASA's blogs. To find her blog, use search for "A Lab Aloft" using any Internet search engine.

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