Students Enrolled at Catholic Institutions Graduate at Higher Rates

Students Enrolled at Catholic Institutions Graduate at Above-Average Rates

A report released last week by the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities (ACCU) found that students who attend Catholic colleges are almost 10 percent more likely to graduate in four years than students at public institutions. The University of Dallas, the region's only Catholic university, reports a four-year graduation rate that is six percentage points higher than the four-year average for Catholic colleges and universities throughout the nation.

For the report, ACCU looked at bachelor's degree attainment for students who enrolled at Catholic and public institutions and found that 54 percent of undergraduate students at Catholic schools receive their bachelor's degree within four years, while 39 percent of those at public institutions finish at the same rate. The gap closes slightly when comparing the six-year graduation rate, 69 vs. 60 percent.

"Much of our success at the University of Dallas, in terms of graduation rates for our undergraduate students, can be attributed to an 11:1 faculty to student ratio, small class sizes and an engaged student life staff," said John Plotts, vice president of enrollment and student affairs. "These factors create an environment in which students receive the individual attention they need to succeed."

The full report, "Bachelor's Degree Attainment: Catholic Colleges and Universities Lead the Way," including research methodology, can be found at www.accunet.org.

 

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