Students Use 3-D Printer to Organize Mouse Cells

Bioprinting Experiment Successfully Organizes Mouse Fibroblast Cells

Biochemistry majors Justin Samorajski '13 and Erin Dinehart '14 and biology majors Christina Andaloro '15 and Joella Butler '15 recently experimented in bioprinting, a new technology that has the medical community hoping to eventually "print" new organs for patients. Bioprinting uses three-dimensional printing technology to direct the organization of living cells.

The students modified the Physics Department's 3-D printer, constructed last fall by Samorajski, with a system of syringes in order to "print" with a gel mixed with the living cells. Using UD's tissue culture lab, Samorajski led the effort at bioprinting mouse fibroblast cells, which form connective tissue in animals and are instrumental in wound healing.

"Bioprinting is one of the biggest scientific developments of the last few years," said Stephen Slaughter, assistant professor of biology. "It's still experimental, but several universities have begun attempting to use this technology to grow organs."

For Samorajski and Butler, the bioprinting experiment was simply extracurricular. Andaloro and Dinehart, on the other hand, will receive research credit for their work on the student-organized project.

PHOTO: Christina Andaloro '15 works at the hood in the tissue culture lab.

 

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