Home Entrepreneurship: Alumni on Homesteading, Homemaking

Home Entrepreneurship: Alumni on Homesteading, Homemaking

 

Starting a family can be as much an entrepreneurial endeavor as starting a business. You must constantly examine finances, plan and schedule; you must be available to your customers (i.e., your children) 24/7.

Many UD alumni take this family entrepreneurship even further. For example, many of them blog about their families everyday troubles and joys, promoting family stories and values just as an entrepreneur might blog to promote a business.

Take Dwija Borobia, BA 01, who writes the blog House Unseen, Life Unscripted. The Borobias have homeschooled for three years.

Its brought our children closer to each other and helped me appreciate my kids and their unique talents, Borobia said. My kids now understand better how different people learn in different ways, respond to different things, are motivated by different rewards and have different interests.

The Borobias keep chickens and also had goats for a while. They make their own laundry soap and their own toothpaste.

There is, at minimum, a history lesson and a science lesson built into every homemaking or homesteading project you take on with your kids, Borobia said.

When Elisa Low, BA 03, became a mother, she began making her own cloth diapers.

It cost $4 to make a cloth diaper, $17 to buy one, Low said.

She sold her diapers on consignment through a local cloth diaper store and eventually bought the store. For five years, she ran it out of her garage, growing $1,000 of inventory to $30,000, expanding into breastfeeding and babywearing products.

At first, it was like having a hobby that made money, Low said. Business finances were separate from family finances. It had to be self-sufficient and make enough money to pay for resources I couldnt provide while I was working, like taking our family out to dinner when I couldnt cook.

Last year, Low realized the store needed to grow beyond her garage and her resources.

I realized it wasnt supposed to be me who took it to the next level, Low said. It wasnt my passion anymore. So I sold it. It was a tough decision, but she knew it was right for herself and her family.

Our alumni constantly demonstrate how a UD education instills a creative, resourceful spirit into every aspect of their lives, whether theyre starting families, starting businesses, or both.

 

PHOTO: Two of Dwija Borobia's children feeding chickens.

News

Our Kids at Heart: The Evangelizing Power of Catholic Education

"You bring me a letter of acceptance to a Catholic school for your child, and I promise your child will attend Catholic school." This is the promise Father Mark Hamlet, BA '68 MBA '70, makes to his congregation at every Mass. The pastor of Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Austin, Hamlet has spent much of his ministry advocating for Catholic school education through his nonprofit foundation, Our Kids at Heart.

+ Read More

Junior Computer Science Major Interns at Google

This past summer, Yeabkal Wubshit, BA '20, earned the internship that every computer science major dreams of: a position at Google -- and spent the summer working on infrastructures for Google Service Accounts at Google's office in Sunnyvale, California.

+ Read More

Distinguished Alumni Excel in Human Endeavor

The University of Dallas will celebrate the extraordinary achievements of four alumni with its 2019 Distinguished Alumni Awards. Award recipients Deacon Harold Burke-Sivers, MTS '00, Laura Felis Quinn, BS '86 MBA '18, Judy Kelly, BA '63, and John Parker, BA '83 MBA '89, will be honored for their contributions to their professions, communities and the University of Dallas.

+ Read More