Longtime English Professor's Magnum Opus To Be Published Posthumously

Longtime English Professor's Magnum Opus To Be Published Posthumously

When Raymond DiLorenzo, professor of English emeritus, passed away in 2010, he left unpublished behind him a manuscript of "The Human Word," his monumental treatment of the history and philosophy of classical rhetoric.

The book, on which DiLorenzo spent his whole career and retirement working, will now be published online at The Arts of Liberty, an interdisciplinary resource for liberal arts teachers and students edited by Jeffrey Lehman, PhD '02. DiLorenzo's prologue to the work is already online. Beginning this Saturday, Jan. 18, The Arts of Liberty will publish a chapter each week until the entire book is online in May.

"Ray's original intention was to publish the book online, so that it would be available to everyone," said Scott Crider, associate professor of English.

Crider helped prepare the work for publication, which he said was confined simply to "tidying up" DiLorenzo's basically complete manuscript.

"'The Human Word' is unusual in that it combines a treatment of both the art and tradition of rhetoric," said Crider. "In the first part, Ray delves into the classical tradition of rhetorical thinking using philosophy and literature. The second part focuses more on the art of rhetoric itself."

"I suspect that, over time, the book will be seen to be one of the most important treatments of the history and philosophy of rhetoric that exists," said Crider.

PHOTO: DiLorenzo, who taught at UD from 1972-2005, is shown here in the 1974 yearbook.

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