Meet the Class of 2018: Archer, OHara Alumna, Future Veterinarian Will Study Biology

Meet the Class of 2018: Archer, Future Veterinarian Will Study Biology

 

Angela Moore has been an archer for two years now. It was always something she wanted to try (which, she emphasizes, was the case prior to "The Hunger Games"), but after moving to Austin from Dallas, there were more opportunities. Only half an hour from her home in Austin, she found a branch of Junior Olympic Archery Development (JOAD), the nationwide program sponsored by USA Archery (the Olympic team).

"I want to go to the Olympics," Moore said. "But I wanted to be a veterinarian before I became an archer, so that has to happen first."

Having received her archery instructor certification this summer, Moore would like not only to start an archery club at UD, but give lessons as well. She's already done her research and found a shooting range just 10 minutes from campus where she'll be able to practice.

In keeping with her career goal of becoming a veterinarian -- perhaps specializing in equestrian medicine -- Moore plans to major in biology. This summer, she participated in the O'Hara Chemical Sciences Institute, UD's intensive summer program for incoming freshmen that provides two semesters of General Chemistry in eight weeks.

"It was tough," Moore admits. "I've been homeschooled since the seventh grade, and book learning is easy for me, but lectures are something entirely new, so that was an adjustment. Then, of course, there's the difference between a high school course and a college course. My advice to homeschoolers in particular is to not be afraid to ask for help."

The program was certainly worthwhile, though, both academically and socially.

"I'm done with General Chemistry," Moore said. "Also, it gave me a taste of what college life is like before the real deal. And I made some good friends. The program is hard, but there are so many of you struggling through it together, and that creates strong bonds."

Moore's oldest brother (she has three, as well as one younger sister) is a UD alumnus; he graduated four years ago and is currently in medical school. With a similar career path in mind, it made sense for Moore to follow in his footsteps; she was drawn to UD because of the high acceptance rate of UD students to medical school and by the strong Catholic atmosphere.

In addition to archery, Moore's other extracurriculars have included being a youth group leader and participating in various mission trips around Texas, including outreach to homeless people in Austin.

"That was very eye-opening," she said. "It helped us to see that homeless people are people, too, just like us, and need our help and our prayers."

Moore has also shadowed veterinarians to get a taste of what her future career might really be like. To earn money, she lifeguards at her neighborhood pool. At UD, she plans to join the Pre-Health Society and the Swing Club. She might also give track a try.

Moore is looking forward to being back on the UD campus.

"I really like learning and academics," she said. "I'm excited about all of the extracurriculars. And it will be good to see my fellow 'O'Harians' again."

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