Vatican II Panel on Lumen Gentium to Discuss Catholic Vision of Church 50 Years Later

"Lumen Gentium" Panel to Discuss Catholic Vision of Church 50 Years Later

 

"The church shares in the very life of the Trinity. The church's task is to allow Christ himself to become visible and active in each member; the church is the Spouse of Christ and our Mother. Mary reveals the beauty and splendor of the church at the end of times," said the Rev. Roch Kereszty, O.Cist., adjunct professor of theology at UD.

These are the topics considered in the Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, "Lumen Gentium," one of the most significant documents of the Second Vatican Council, which presented the church as a mystery, as a communion of baptized believers, as the people of God, as the body of Christ and as a pilgrim moving toward fulfillment in heaven but marked on earth with a real but imperfect sanctity. Fr. Kereszty is one of three panelists for UD's upcoming presentation and panel discussion on "Lumen Gentium."

Continuing UD's celebration of the 50th anniversary of Vatican II, the panel will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 15, from 7 - 8:30 p.m. in the upstairs Haggar dining room. All members of the UD community are invited to attend.

Promulgated on Nov. 21, 1964, "Lumen Gentium" is one of the four constitutions of Vatican II, addressing fundamental topics of the church, its origins and hierarchical nature. The panelists will explore the constitution's reception and application in the church over the past half-century.

Panelists are Fr. Kereszty; Dan Luby, S.T.D., assistant professor of theology and director of the graduate program in UD's School of Ministry; and Bruce D. Marshall, Ph.D., Lehman Professor of Christian Doctrine at Southern Methodist University.

"Even 50 years after the council, if you ask most Catholics what the Constitution on the Church is all about, they would reply, 'The church is not only the hierarchy, but the entire People of God,'" said Fr. Kereszty. According to Fr. Kereszty, while this is true, it is not the full story. The panel on "Lumen Gentium" will aim at examining this subject in greater depth.

PHOTO: Lothar Wolleh

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