Art Historian to Deliver Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Lecture

Art Historian to Deliver Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Lecture

 

Renowned art historian and Duke University A. M. Cogan Professor of Art and Art History Caroline Bruzelius will visit the University of Dallas as part of the Phi Beta Kappa Society Visiting Scholar Series April 16-17. As part of the visit, Bruzelius will deliver a public lecture on "Building on the Inquisition: How Poor Friars Paid for Expensive Churches in the Middle Ages," Thursday, April 16, at 7 p.m. in the Art History Auditorium on the University of Dallas campus. On Friday, April 17, she will speak on The Cathedral and the City at the Museum of Biblical Art in Dallas. Both lectures are free and open to the public.

"We're excited to welcome to campus such a distinguished art historian," said University of Dallas Associate Professor of English and Phi Beta Kappa Eta Chapter of Texas President Gregory Roper. "Dr. Bruzelius shares her area of focus -- medieval architecture -- with many on campus who learn to love these places through our semester-long Rome Program."

Bruzelius, an art historian who specializes in medieval monastic architecture, is also a founder of Wired! and Visualizing Venice, initiatives that integrate digital technologies into teaching and research. The Wired! Group has undertaken initiatives to reconstruct the locations of ancient sculpture and reflect on the transportation of precious materials in antiquity using, among other tools, laser scanning and animation.

She has published numerous books, most recently, Preaching, Building and Burying: Friars in the Medieval City, which investigates how religious orders dedicated to apostolic poverty were able to create large-scale monastic complexes within crowded medieval cities.

From 1994-1998, Bruzelius served as Director of the American Academy in Rome. She earned her doctorate at Yale University.

Bruzelius visit to the University of Dallas is made possible by the Phi Beta Kappa Society. Since 1956, the Phi Beta Kappa Society's Visiting Scholar Program has given undergraduates the opportunity to spend time with some of Americas most distinguished scholars. The visiting scholars spend two days on campus, taking full part in the academic life of the institution by meeting informally with students and faculty members, participating in classroom discussions and giving a public lecture.

In 1989, the University of Dallas became the youngest university in the 20th century to receive a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. Founded in 1776, Phi Beta Kappa is the nations oldest academic honor society. The society's mission is to champion education in the liberal arts and sciences, to recognize academic excellence, and to foster freedom of thought and expression.

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