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Class of 2015 Enjoys High Rate of Employment, Acceptance to Graduate Programs

Class of 2015 Enjoys High Employment, Graduate School Acceptance Rates


A mere two months after their graduation, 83.3 percent of the Class of 2015 is either employed or continuing their educations in graduate or professional programs. Four programs can boast a 100 percent rate for their graduates having already landed in their first destinations: Classics and Classical Philology, Human Sciences in the Contemporary World, Pastoral Ministry and Physics.

In the Office of Personal Career Development, we encourage graduates to pursue first experiences after graduation that put them on a trajectory toward their calling, said Director of Career Services Julie Janik. We let them know that the first job is an experience that will help them gain better understanding and will probably not be their forever job.

The Class of 2015 included a total of 297 graduates, 289 of whom were able to immediately either seek employment or pursue graduate or professional school. Seventy-two are continuing education, and 170 are employed, which includes traditional employment, military service, volunteer service and church/mission work.

For the programs at 100 percent, examples of their first destinations include:

  • director of youth and young adult ministry (Pastoral Ministry)
  • theology teacher (Pastoral Ministry)
  • imaging physics technologist (Physics)
  • Fulbright Scholar/English language teaching assistant (Physics)
  • graduate school at various institutions (Physics), including:
    • Purdue University
    • Georgia Institute of Technology
    • University of California Los Angeles
  • graduate school at Indiana University (Classics)
  • teacher at Great Hearts Academy (Classics)
  • CityYear (AmeriCorps) post-graduate service (Human Sciences in the Contemporary World)

The Class of 2015 is exhibiting more diversity in their professional choices than any class in the past five years, choosing from a wide range of industries and geographical locations, said Janik. This class is also landing much quicker than any class in the last five years.

24.9 percent are continuing education, and 58.8 percent are employed in their chosen field and/or in a role requiring a degree. Of employed candidates in the traditional workforce, the average salary is $41,020.

These statistics explicitly demonstrate that our graduates clearly articulate the value of their University of Dallas education, which has given them the personal and professional preparation to meaningfully contribute, said Janik.

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