New Classics Graduate Program Tailored for Future Doctoral Students, Teachers

New Classics Graduate Program Tailored for Future Doctoral Students, Teachers


The University of Dallas Classics Department is now offering two new graduate degrees in Latin and ancient Greek studies: a Master of Arts in Classics and a Master of Classics. Both degrees are tailored toward students who seek to enter a doctoral program in classics or those who teach the classical languages at either the primary or secondary level.

The Classics Department provides a rigorous, foundational education in the Latin and Greek languages, said David Sweet, associate professor and chair of classics, who will direct the new graduate program in classics. Our masters programs are ideal preparation for teaching or further graduate study.

Both 30 credit-hour programs require advanced reading knowledge of Latin or Greek and passing a comprehensive examination. The Master of Arts in Classics requires 24 credit-hours of coursework and completion of a six credit-hour masters thesis. The Master of Classics requires 30 credit-hours of coursework. Graduate classics students may also take courses pertaining to their discipline outside the department, such as history and literature. A knowledge of Latin or Greek is not a prerequisite for the program.

With nearly 17,000 students enrolled in primary or secondary Latin courses, Texas has more Latin students than any other state in the U.S. Nonetheless, few resources exist for graduate education and professional development for the states Latin teachers. The University of Dallas Classics Departments new program will become only the third of its kind within the state, according to the Society for Classical Learning. Students in the university's Classics Department have the added benefit of studying at a university which, as a whole, views the study of classical texts as an indispensable foundation to a liberal education.

For admission criteria and more information about the program, visit


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