Campus Visit

5 Ways to Get the Most Out of Your Campus Visit

Crusader Preview

Date published: Feb. 15, 2016

Today is Crusader Preview day. If you’re one of the more than 100 high school juniors visiting campus today, or if you’re planning a visit in the future, here are five ways you can make the most of your time here on campus.

  1. Take a campus tour. If you end up coming to school at UD, you’ll be spending four years here -- so you want to make sure you can imagine yourself walking around and enjoying your time on the campus itself.
  2. Ask any and all questions. The Admissions staff is used to answering lots of questions; in fact, that’s a big part of why they’re here! No question is silly or stupid. If you think of it, it’s likely someone else did, too.
  3. Talk to faculty. In fact, make a request with the Admissions staff to schedule a time to meet with a professor from the department of your probable major -- or, if you don’t know yet what your major might be, a department that interests you. This will give you a good insight into what your experience as a student might be like.
  4. Talk to students -- they’re the best source for giving you the inside scoop on what the school is really like.
  5. Take a souvenir home, like a T-shirt! This may not seem like such a big deal, but there’s something about having a material reminder of your visit experience that could help with your decision later on.

Best of luck with the college selection process, and please let us know if there’s anything we can do to help. We hope to see your face on campus again in the not-too-distant future!

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