Marc Chagall

Marc Chagall:  Intersecting Traditions

IMAGE: Marc Chagall; Jacob’s Ladder, 1957

February 4, 2016 – April 22, 2016

Featuring over 50 original works, Marc Chagall: Intersecting Traditions is a series of hand water colored etchings depicting scenes from the Old Testament. As a modern, Jewish artist, Chagall developed a unique visual vocabulary that synthesized elements from diverse cultural and artistic traditions. Because he approached the Old Testament narratives as a set of stories and recurring themes to be broadly interpreted, Marc Chagall was able to produce a deeply human and personal body of work that remains relevant today.

Beatrice and Patrick Haggerty gifted the complete portfolio of prints to the Haggerty Museum at Marquette University, Mr. Haggerty’s alma mater, in 1980. We are grateful to their son Patrick Haggerty and the Haggerty Family Foundation for the generous support in making this exhibition possible.

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