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Parent Resources

Resources for Parents

As you prepare for your student to attend the University of Dallas, we know that YOU are probably going through some transitions and adjustments yourself. With that in mind, we share the following suggestions to help make your student's adjustment (and yours) smooth and healthy.

Listen: Allow your student to share his/her feelings and expectations about all of the new experiences college life will bring. Encourage your student to share both the excitement and concerns with you without reserving judgment by simply allowing your son or daughter to just talk.

Inquire: It is understandable that your student may be hesitant to share with you pre-college apprehensions and some experiences during the first year of college. Therefore it is important to ask about those subjects that your student might feel uncomfortable talking about. While you will probably ask how classes are going, you should also inquire about his or her social relationships (new friends, roommate(s), or romantic relationships). Ask your student about weekend activities and the choices he or she has made in regards to alcohol and drugs. Even though your student may not share everything with you, it is helpful for him or her to know that you are willing to discuss these topics should the need arise.

Support: Learn about the various resources available to the students at the University of Dallas. Regardless of the situation which your student might encounter, there is always someone on UD's campus that can help. Letting your student know that you have confidence in his or her abilities will greatly enhance your student's confidence. Phone calls, emails, cards and care packages are great ways to show you care and stay connected.

Suggest: Make suggestions when appropriate. Even though it is important for first year students to solve problems on their own, sometimes they need a point in the right direction. Be prepared to help your student find the resources needed to help. It is an important step in maturation for students to solve problems on their own; do not overstep this boundary and handle matters for them.

Share: Share your thoughts and feelings about your student's college experiences. Talk about your expectations regarding academics and behavior before your student leaves for college to avoid problems in the future.

Accept: College is a time of change for many students. Your student will continue to develop opinions and thoughts on a variety of issues and topics. Accept your student's emerging independence. He or she may decide on a major different than what you had recommended, or may adopt a different political view. Engaging in constructive dialogue will strengthen your relationship even though your opinions may differ.

Understand: Understand that everyone makes mistakes. Try not to overreact when your student makes a mistake, as this will discourage him or her from sharing information with you. Reacting calmly to adverse situations and supporting your student through any pitfalls will set a good precedent for communication throughout college life.

News

University Announces New Director of Civil Rights

The University of Dallas has announced a new director of civil rights, Luciana Milano. Milano, who has a Bachelor of Arts in government from Harvard College and a J.D. from Southern Methodist University’s Dedman School of Law, began her new role on Oct. 12.

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Donors Endow Philosophy Scholarship in St. John Henry Newman’s Name

“This is the first time we’ve had a scholarship in honor of a great Catholic intellectual — and now, within the last year, saint,” said President Thomas S. Hibbs, Ph.D., BA ’82 MA ’83, by way of introducing the St. John Henry Newman Scholarship in Philosophy recently endowed by alumnus Matthew Hejduk, MA '98 PhD '06, and his wife, Julia Hejduk, Ph.D. Julia was a colleague of Hibbs during his time at Baylor University, where she teaches in the Classics Department.

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Former Teacher, MFA Alumna Explores Memory, Pursues Art Full Time

Michelle Cortez-Gonzales, MFA ’20, was a Fort Worth ISD high school teacher with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting from the University of Texas at Arlington when she decided to go back to school to get her master’s. At the recommendation of a friend, she visited UD, and knew immediately from the wooded area around the Art Village, the architecture of the buildings, and the faculty members she met that UD was the place for her.

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