Missing Women in Action

M. W. I. A: Missing Women In Action

men vs women

Author: Christina Davis
Date: October 30, 2014

In the classic article, More Than 100 Million Women Are Missing, Amartya Sen brilliantly articulates the problem of the declining number of women in the world's population. Here, he presents an analysis of the status quo that examines the reason for the diminishing number of women in the world. Through a clear, effective presentation, he encourages increased research into the population of women on the international scene before policy is enacted.

Sen begins his analysis of the world population by comparing the genetic qualities of men and women. Despite being better genetically geared for survival than men, women are fewer in number throughout the world. Sen recognizes that lower income countries (LICs) do not offer proper medical assistance and healthcare for women within their borders, which accounts for a major diminishment in the international population of women. Since LICs have the majority of the world's population but also the smallest access to healthcare, Sen concludes that womens' survival rates greatly suffer.

One of Sen's strongest points is his critique of the statement that sexism and economic development problems have limited the population of women to grow. He states that the former argument does not take into account the amount of political persons in Asia in the past few decades that have been women, despite limited access to education, therein disproving the statement that sexism dominates the Middle East and Asia. As for economic difficulties, Sen states that such an argument is non-unique at the international scale, as it is difficult to define countries with different economic troubles due to societal and cultural differences and influences.

Though sexism and economic development issues do not seem to be limiting the survival rates of women in the world, Sen argues that employment directly affects women. He states that there is a correlation between women working and having better survival. By having work, an unexplained, but consistent observation is made the more women have access to gainful employment and use it, their survival rates increase.

An example Sen employs to illustrate his reasons for supporting his particular conclusion of a need for increased research in the decreasing population of women in the world is the country of China. According to Sen's analysis, the population of women suffers due to the regulation of family members, especially gender defined regulations, no access to quality healthcare, and little opportunities for skilled employment.

Finally, Sen concludes that the diminishing population of women in the world must be addressed by additional research. Since specific social and cultural circumstances affect the overall population of women in a country, as seen in the example of China, more analysis must be undertaken before policy can be enacted. Since women are neglected in the areas of nutrition, medicine, and healthcare, Sen claims that for action to be formulated, more research is necessary for success.

The hypothesis that Sen presents in More Than 100 Million Women Are Missing is accurately represented in a logical, factual manner. Instead of abstracting from the cited data, he calls for increased research in the diverse study of population development before sufficient action can be undertaken. By bringing the issue of the diminishing female population to the table, Sen initiates the necessary discussion to increase action and research into the meager survival of the women of the world.

 

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