Physics and Engineering

Physics & Engineering

A Computational Analysis of the Fermi, Pasta, Ulam Paradox

This paper presents a computational study of the Fermi, Pasta, Ulam (FPU) paradox as it is applied to a system of nonlinear springs and thirty-two masses. The chain of springs and masses experiences motion only in one direction without the forces of friction or internal heating present to reduce the energy of the system. The program, written in Python, uses the Runge-Kutta method and Newtons second law for its calculations of motion.

Energy of a Two-Gas System

This paper presents a computational program designed to simulate a two-gas system in Visual Python. Similar to the well-known "Particles in a Box", this simulation aims to illustrate the energies of two initially separated gases of different temperatures as they mix together and proceed toward equilibrium.

The Zeeman Catastrophe Machine

Catastrophe theory states that for certain non-linear systems, small changes in the parameters may cause dramatic changes in the equilibrium. The problem is how to set the parameters such that one can examine the interesting behavior of the hypothetical situation. This paper examines the aspects of the chaotic Zeeman Catastrophe Machine, invented by Christopher Zeeman in 1969.

Thermodynamic Properties of Engine Cycles

The objective of this project was to create a model for three different types of engine cycles: Carnot Cycle, Otto Cycle, and Brayton Cycle. These models will simulate the different steps of each process and calculate the energy and work done. The models were all initially computed using hydrogen as a fuel source. Real data was then obtained that allowed the models to be adjusted to match more realistic situations.

H. A. Lorentz as the Grandfather of Quantum Physics

The first Solvay Conference in the fall of 1911 set a precedent for how leading physicists collaborate in order to solve difficult problems such as blackbody radiation and the photoelectric effect. By the end of the fifth Solvay Conference in 1927, the foundation had been laid for the theory of Quantum Mechanics. Besides featuring many prominent scientists in the field of quantum physics such as Einstein and Bohr, the first five Solvay Conferences had one very important characteristic that they all shared: they were chaired by Hendrik Lorentz. 

News

UD in Service: Ph.D. Students Share 'Confessions' in South Irving

UD students not only read St. Augustine's Confessions in Rome, traveling to Ostia to marvel at the place in which, according to Book IX, St. Augustine and his mother, St. Monica, had a joint mystical vision of God -- they also travel 4.4 miles from the Irving campus to read the text with residents of South Irving.

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How to Build a Shortwave Radio

As you know if you’ve read even some of our first UD Reads book, "All the Light We Cannot See," it’s possible to build a radio from random, scavenged parts, as long as you can find the necessary random, scavenged parts, as Werner does in the book. This is also essentially what Assistant Professor and Department Chair of Physics Jacob Moldenhauer did as well: He scavenged parts from the Physics Department, and built a radio.

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Thomas S. Hibbs Appointed President of University of Dallas

The University of Dallas Board of Trustees announced today that it has unanimously selected Thomas S. Hibbs, Ph.D., BA '82 MA '83, to serve as the university's ninth president. The first alumnus of UD to be president, Hibbs has served as dean of the Honors College and distinguished professor of ethics and culture at Baylor University since 2003.

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