Psychology 2013-2014


Auditory Verbal Agnosia

Auditory verbal agnosia, better known as pure word deafness (PWD), is an exceptionally rare and specific type of auditory agnosia. Agnosias in general are defined as having the inability to interpret and understand sensations. Like other agnosias, PWD is not classified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) because it is not considered to be a psychological disorder. The primary symptom of PWD is the inability to comprehend spoken words. PWD patients describe hearing spoken language as meaningless noise as though the person speaking was talking in a foreign language. Additionally, it has also been noted that these patients experience greater difficulty perceiving consonants because they are temporally more dynamic stimuli compared to vowels which are steady state stimuli (Slevc, Martin, Hamilton, and Joanisse, 2011). Interestingly, patients with PWD maintain the ability to hear environmental sounds, speak, repeat spoken language, read, and write (Wirkowski, Echausse, Overby, Ortiz, and Radler, 2006).

Survival Psychology According to John Leach

It is an unfortunate truth that disasters, whether natural or man-made, occur and force people into situations of high anxiety that often lead to death. John Leach, a psychologist in the field of survival psychology at the University of Lancaster, has observed, however, that people in these situations often die unnecessarily. This surprising and seemingly unusual statement has led Leach to pursue the question of why in an identical survival setting, some people die and others don't. In his studies, Leach has identified cognitive processes, particularly working memory, which inhibit one's ability to survive in a situation of extreme anxiety. Leach's findings have ultimately led to the opinion that "it is not the 'will-to-live,' but the 'won't to live' that matters" in a survival situation (Survival, 26).


2018 Galbraith Lecture Explores 'Dante and Liturgical Time'

As we age, most of us ask ourselves, where has the time gone? Borrowing text from UD's Core curriculum, this spring semester's Galbraith Lecture will explore the difference between our own perception of time, and how the philosopher-poet Dante Alighieri viewed mankind's immortal clock, steeped in Scripture and in life.

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UD Presents: 'Dwelling: Paintings by Peter Ligon and Layla Luna'

The Beatrice M. Haggerty Gallery is pleased to announce an upcoming exhibition featuring two Dallas/Fort Worth area artists, Peter Ligon and Layla Luna, who articulate the architectural styling of dwelling spaces in their paintings. Both artists will give presentations at an opening reception on Friday, March 23, at 5:30 p.m. in the Haggar Art History Auditorium located in the Haggerty Art Village on the University of Dallas’ Irving campus.

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Politics Major Empowers Youth, Shares Story Through Theater

Although she herself is not able to vote, Liz Magallanes, BA '18, works to make voting possible for other people. She first got involved with the organization Mi Familia Vota in 2014 and has been contributing to their endeavors ever since, including working with high school students in Dallas ISD. Additionally, she recently had a role in the play "Deferred Action."

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