Psychology 2013-2014

2013-2014

Auditory Verbal Agnosia

Auditory verbal agnosia, better known as pure word deafness (PWD), is an exceptionally rare and specific type of auditory agnosia. Agnosias in general are defined as having the inability to interpret and understand sensations. Like other agnosias, PWD is not classified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) because it is not considered to be a psychological disorder. The primary symptom of PWD is the inability to comprehend spoken words. PWD patients describe hearing spoken language as meaningless noise as though the person speaking was talking in a foreign language. Additionally, it has also been noted that these patients experience greater difficulty perceiving consonants because they are temporally more dynamic stimuli compared to vowels which are steady state stimuli (Slevc, Martin, Hamilton, and Joanisse, 2011). Interestingly, patients with PWD maintain the ability to hear environmental sounds, speak, repeat spoken language, read, and write (Wirkowski, Echausse, Overby, Ortiz, and Radler, 2006).

Survival Psychology According to John Leach

It is an unfortunate truth that disasters, whether natural or man-made, occur and force people into situations of high anxiety that often lead to death. John Leach, a psychologist in the field of survival psychology at the University of Lancaster, has observed, however, that people in these situations often die unnecessarily. This surprising and seemingly unusual statement has led Leach to pursue the question of why in an identical survival setting, some people die and others don't. In his studies, Leach has identified cognitive processes, particularly working memory, which inhibit one's ability to survive in a situation of extreme anxiety. Leach's findings have ultimately led to the opinion that "it is not the 'will-to-live,' but the 'won't to live' that matters" in a survival situation (Survival, 26).

News

Iraqi Couple Will Use UD Education to Enrich, Preserve Culture

They came here so that someday, they can go back with even more to offer. Sana Kandalan, MA '19, and Anmar Oghanna, MBA '19, a wife and husband, both received scholarships to pursue graduate education at UD; they hope to use their degrees and experiences here to better serve their community back home in Erbil.

+ Read More

Trailblazing Golden Crusaders Pave Path for Future Generations

During their freshman year, a mere nine miles from the UD campus, President John F. Kennedy was shot in Dealey Plaza on Nov. 22, 1963. Kennedy's famous words, "Ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man," were imprinted on the memories of these freshmen, influencing the development of their characters and philanthropic spirits and empowering them to serve with distinction in all types of vocations.

+ Read More

Professor Scott Churchill Explores the Souls of Animals

After happening across the early biophilosopher Jakob von Uexküll as a freshman biology major, Professor of Psychology Scott Churchill began peering into the worlds of animals through what Uexküll called the "spiritual eye" rather than our physical one; there, he discovered the animal spirit.

+ Read More