Psychology

Psychology

Hugo Mnsterberg: the Rise, the Fall, the Legacy

Hugo Mnsterberg was a pioneer who revolutionized and strengthened psychology in the United States. Mnsterberg left a legacy from his work as a scientist, philosopher, and psychologist. His influence on the fields of applied, forensic, and industrial psychology have shaped and have expanded the future of the American psychological movement and its influence over several different fields.

The Origin of Husserlian Phenomenological Psychology and its Contemporary Promulgations

The author attributes the origins of phenomenological psychology to the philosophies of Husserl and Heidegger. Next, the author summarizes the metamorphoses of psychology in the wake of the so-called Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century and how these metamorphoses prepared for phenomenology's emergence in a milieu of phenomenal inquiry in complement to a predominantly quantitative methodology. Then, the author considers the reception of phenomenology by the Munich School (where Lipps psychologism was followed) and explores the disagreement between psychologism considered more broadly and phenomenology about the basis of logic. This leads to a discussion of the distinction between psychological and philosophical phenomenology on the basis of the method of reduction or bracketing employed.

Schizophrenia: The Mind Is in the Works

In this paper, I will explore the changing nature of schizophrenia throughout history, drawing from previous historical psychological articles ones that reveal the way in which schizophrenia was understood in the first 45 years that the term was coined, as well as articles that explore the same psychological construct today. In addition to looking at the historical construction of the term, I will use two different approaches to guide my research.

Self-Efficacy and Academic Performance

In this paper, I will discuss the current reviewed literature on the relationship between self-efficacy and academic performance among college students in light of possible third variables that may affect this relationship. I will then state my hypotheses and my method in conducting this study. I will present my results and then discuss them, returning to the reviewed literature.

An Investigation of Attitudes Towards People with Mental Disabilities

Does what you study impact your attitude towards people with mental disabilities? Previous research has examined the association between experience and attitudes towards people with mental disabilities (Crowson, 2010) and has found a strong positive correlation between the two variables. Researchers have also found a mild correlation between career pursued and attitudes towards people with mental disabilities (Hampton & Xiao, 2009).

Self-Referent Constructs for the Socially Anxious

This paper will first address the reviewed literature on self-esteem, self-efficacy, social self-efficacy and social anxiety as well as the relationships between these constructs. Next, the hypotheses and method for the present study will be explained. The statistical results will then be presented, followed by a discussion of these results in light of the literature reviewed. References and appendices will follow, the latter containing the administered survey and visual representations of the results.

A Phenomenological Investigation of Being Jealous

Our participant and his girlfriend set a time to meet. The girlfriend is late and the participant begins to worry about where she is, or what may have happened to her. When she finally arrives, he is irritated with her for being twenty minutes late. He blames his actions on biological and evolutionary urges within himself that he has little control over.

What is Phenomenology?

Phenomenology is a type of qualitative research in that its focus is in answering the 'what is it' question rather than questions of frequency or magnitude such as 'how much' and 'how many.' While quantitative research answers these questions of frequency and magnitude and therefore explains why the phenomenon of interest occurs, qualitative research, including phenomenology, works to describe the phenomenon (Giorgi, 2009). Phenomenology as a qualitative method therefore does not oppose the quantitative method but simply asks a different question in order to further explicate the meaning of the phenomenon.

Auditory Verbal Agnosia

Auditory verbal agnosia, better known as pure word deafness (PWD), is an exceptionally rare and specific type of auditory agnosia. Agnosias in general are defined as having the inability to interpret and understand sensations. Like other agnosias, PWD is not classified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) because it is not considered to be a psychological disorder. The primary symptom of PWD is the inability to comprehend spoken words. PWD patients describe hearing spoken language as meaningless noise as though the person speaking was talking in a foreign language. Additionally, it has also been noted that these patients experience greater difficulty perceiving consonants because they are temporally more dynamic stimuli compared to vowels which are steady state stimuli (Slevc, Martin, Hamilton, and Joanisse, 2011). Interestingly, patients with PWD maintain the ability to hear environmental sounds, speak, repeat spoken language, read, and write (Wirkowski, Echausse, Overby, Ortiz, and Radler, 2006).

Survival Psychology According to John Leach

It is an unfortunate truth that disasters, whether natural or man-made, occur and force people into situations of high anxiety that often lead to death. John Leach, a psychologist in the field of survival psychology at the University of Lancaster, has observed, however, that people in these situations often die unnecessarily. This surprising and seemingly unusual statement has led Leach to pursue the question of why in an identical survival setting, some people die and others don't. In his studies, Leach has identified cognitive processes, particularly working memory, which inhibit one's ability to survive in a situation of extreme anxiety. Leach's findings have ultimately led to the opinion that "it is not the 'will-to-live,' but the 'won't to live' that matters" in a survival situation (Survival, 26).

News

UD Earns Recognition Among America's Best Liberal Arts Colleges

The University of Dallas has been recognized in the 2017-18 Colleges of Distinction Guidebook for the eighth consecutive year among nearly 400 of America's best liberal arts institutions. The annual college guidebook featured the university for having one of the nation's most vibrant college communities and named UD as one of three Catholic Colleges of Distinction in Texas.

+ Read More

Endowment Honors Father, Helps Students Go to Rome

Charles T. Uhl, who worked in UD's IT Department, sent four of his five children to UD and to Rome. When their father passed away, the Uhl children, along with their mother, Nancy, set up a scholarship fund in his name to enable more students to be able to afford Rome each semester.

+ Read More

Iraqi Couple Will Use UD Education to Enrich, Preserve Culture

They came here so that someday, they can go back with even more to offer. Sana Kandalan, MA '19, and Anmar Oghanna, MBA '19, a wife and husband, both received scholarships to pursue graduate education at UD; they hope to use their degrees and experiences here to better serve their community back home in Erbil.

+ Read More