Humanities Courses

Customize your program of study.

The core of the humanities program consists of a sequence of six special courses called the "World Courses." These courses are devoted to the study of major works in the formation of the West and each is given by faculty from the several participating departments in the humanities. Any three of these courses are required: the Ancient World, the Medieval World, the Renaissance World, the Baroque World, the Modern World, and the Recent World.

In support of the core, customize the remainder of your program around either one or two concentrations (15-18 credit hours), or one or two periods (15-18 credit hours), and related courses (6-9 credit hours).

Several courses can be completed online.

World Courses

The Ancient World

The thought and art of Greece and Rome from 800 B.C. to 400 A.D. Texts vary but are chosen from works ranging from those of Homer and the Greek tragedians to Vergil and the Roman historians.

The Medieval World

The thought and art of the Middle Ages from 400 to 1500. Readings of works of the major writers from Augustine, Boethius and Bede to Aquinas, Dante, and Chaucer.

The Renaissance World

The thought and art of Europe from 1400 to 1600. Readings selected from the works of Petrarch, Pico della Mirandola, Machiavelli, Erasmus, More, Luther, Montaigne, Spenser, Cervantes, and others.

The Baroque World 

The thought and art of the period from 1600 to 1750. Authors read typically include Shakespeare, Bacon, Donne, Descartes, Moliere, Milton, Hobbes, and Racine.

The Modern World

The thought and art of Europe from 1750 to 1900. Readings of works from Locke, Newton, Pope, Swift, Hume, Voltaire, Rousseau, Kant, Goethe, Wordsworth, Hegel, and others.

The Recent World 

The thought and art of the century from 1900 to the present. Authors read regularly include Kierkegaard, Dostoevski, Tolstoi, Darwin, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Yeats, Joyce, and Mann. 


American Studies, Classics, Classical Education, History, Literature, Philosophy, Politics, Theology and Psychology


Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Modern and Recent

Related Courses

Draw from such fields as Art History, Drama, Economics, Education, Greek, Latin or Modern Languages (French, German, Italian, and Spanish).

For full course descriptions, please see the University Course Catalogue. 


2018 Galbraith Lecture Explores 'Dante and Liturgical Time'

As we age, most of us ask ourselves, where has the time gone? Borrowing text from UD's Core curriculum, this spring semester's Galbraith Lecture will explore the difference between our own perception of time, and how the philosopher-poet Dante Alighieri viewed mankind's immortal clock, steeped in Scripture and in life.

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UD Presents: 'Dwelling: Paintings by Peter Ligon and Layla Luna'

The Beatrice M. Haggerty Gallery is pleased to announce an upcoming exhibition featuring two Dallas/Fort Worth area artists, Peter Ligon and Layla Luna, who articulate the architectural styling of dwelling spaces in their paintings. Both artists will give presentations at an opening reception on Friday, March 23, at 5:30 p.m. in the Haggar Art History Auditorium located in the Haggerty Art Village on the University of Dallas’ Irving campus.

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Politics Major Empowers Youth, Shares Story Through Theater

Although she herself is not able to vote, Liz Magallanes, BA '18, works to make voting possible for other people. She first got involved with the organization Mi Familia Vota in 2014 and has been contributing to their endeavors ever since, including working with high school students in Dallas ISD. Additionally, she recently had a role in the play "Deferred Action."

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