Humanities Courses

Customize your program of study.

The core of the humanities program consists of a sequence of six special courses called the "World Courses." These courses are devoted to the study of major works in the formation of the West and each is given by faculty from the several participating departments in the humanities. Any three of these courses are required: the Ancient World, the Medieval World, the Renaissance World, the Baroque World, the Modern World, and the Recent World.

In support of the core, customize the remainder of your program around either one or two concentrations (15-18 credit hours), or one or two periods (15-18 credit hours), and related courses (6-9 credit hours).

Several courses can be completed online.

World Courses

The Ancient World

The thought and art of Greece and Rome from 800 B.C. to 400 A.D. Texts vary but are chosen from works ranging from those of Homer and the Greek tragedians to Vergil and the Roman historians.

The Medieval World

The thought and art of the Middle Ages from 400 to 1500. Readings of works of the major writers from Augustine, Boethius and Bede to Aquinas, Dante, and Chaucer.

The Renaissance World

The thought and art of Europe from 1400 to 1600. Readings selected from the works of Petrarch, Pico della Mirandola, Machiavelli, Erasmus, More, Luther, Montaigne, Spenser, Cervantes, and others.

The Baroque World 

The thought and art of the period from 1600 to 1750. Authors read typically include Shakespeare, Bacon, Donne, Descartes, Moliere, Milton, Hobbes, and Racine.

The Modern World

The thought and art of Europe from 1750 to 1900. Readings of works from Locke, Newton, Pope, Swift, Hume, Voltaire, Rousseau, Kant, Goethe, Wordsworth, Hegel, and others.

The Recent World 

The thought and art of the century from 1900 to the present. Authors read regularly include Kierkegaard, Dostoevski, Tolstoi, Darwin, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Yeats, Joyce, and Mann. 

Concentrations

American Studies, Classics, Classical Education, History, Literature, Philosophy, Politics, Theology and Psychology

Periods

Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Modern and Recent

Related Courses

Draw from such fields as Art History, Drama, Economics, Education, Greek, Latin or Modern Languages (French, German, Italian, and Spanish).

For full course descriptions, please see the University Course Catalogue. 

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