About Constantin College

30 majors in the arts, humanities and natural and social sciences

The Constantin College of Liberal Arts is the center of undergraduate education at the University of Dallas. In addition to offering 30 undergraduate academic programs, Constantin College is also home to the Core curriculum, a course of study focused on the great works of Western civilization that’s taken by all undergraduates, regardless of major, designed to develop critical thinking skills and inspire intellectual inquiry through the rigorous examination of who we are and how we relate to God, nature and each other. With a student-to-faculty ratio of 10:1 and an average class size of 16, the courses in the Core curriculum provide an amazing atmosphere to develop the intellectual skills that will help you succeed throughout your academic career and the rest of your life. 

Studying in Rome

Constantin College is also home to UD’s Rome Program. This semester abroad — usually taken during the sophomore year — gives students the opportunity to experience firsthand the art, architecture, history and culture of Ancient Greece, the Roman Republic and Empire, the Early Christian Church and Renaissance Italy while staying at our beautiful campus located in the foothills of Rome.

News

You Can Do What with a (Spanish) Degree?

His first step was to enroll in physician’s assistant school at Baylor’s College of Medicine, a career trajectory to which he had aspired since his early childhood. Nowadays, Jonathan Cunningham, BA ’17, is dedicated to the vocational pursuit of comfort and healing at MD Anderson in Houston, among the largest cancer treatment centers in the U.S., where he was once a chemotherapy patient himself.

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History Alumnus Heads National Catholic Bioethics Center

During his Rome semester in 1991, Joseph Meaney, BA '93, with his friends (now Father) Kevin Cook, BA '94, and (now Texas State Representative and UD Trustee) Tan Parker, BA '93, attended a private Mass with Pope St. John Paul II. Several weeks earlier, they had hand-delivered a letter to the Swiss Guards outside St. Peter's requesting the Mass and including their contact information; at last, they'd received the phone call instructing them to be at the Bronze Gates at 5 a.m.

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