Physics Concentration

Applied Physics Concentration

Students at the University of Dallas may find that traditional departmental boundaries are not adequate to describe the breadth of their interest, especially when post-baccalaureate plans are considered.  Though they may choose a major in Mathematics or Philosophy or Biology, they may also have an interest in bolstering their education with further applications and models of Physics.  In addition, a student who seeks secondary certification with a science composite would find the Applied Physics Concentration useful in fulfilling certification requirements.  The concentration in Applied Physics seeks to provide students the opportunities to pursue new studies that relate to their major and life interests.

The concentration consists of six courses and associated labs.  The core courses in the concentrations are General Physics I and lab, calculus or trig-based, General Physics II and lab, calculus or trig-based, and Computational Physics.

Two courses may be selected from the following:

  • PHY 2310 Astronomy.
  • PHY 3320/3120 Quantum Physics and Lab.
  • PHY 3341/3141 Optics and Lab.
  • PHY 3333/3133 Electronics and Lab.
  • PHY 4327 Electromagnetic Theory.
  • or a 4000-level course in Astrophysics, Condensed Matter Physics, Biophysics, or Nuclear Physics.

The sixth course is an elective from a field other than physics that allows the student to tailor the concentration to his or her interests.  Possible choices include the following or an elective approved by the Director.

  • CHE 3331 Physical Chemistry I
  • CHE 3320 Inorganic Chemistry II
  • ECO 3328 Econometrics
  • MAT 4315 Applied Math I
  • MAT 3326 Probability
  • EDU 4346 Principles of Secondary Education
  • EDU 5352 Educational Evaluation
  • BIO 3345 Biostatistics
  • BIO 3335 Biochemistry I
  • BIO 3331/3131 Physiology
  • PHI 4333 Philosophy of Science
  • PHI 4334 Bioethics

 

News

Dignifying Humanity

Standing on the edge of border America, Diocese of El Paso Bishop Mark J. Seitz, BA '76, serves a role of vital importance as the pastor of a community divided by the United States-Mexico border. "Recently we have witnessed indefensible, hateful words toward our neighbors in Mexico, the demonization of migrants, and destructive language about our border," Seitz wrote in his July pastoral letter titled "Sorrow and Mourning Flee Away," earning him national attention amid significant upheaval of immigration rights.

+ Read More

The Rome Experience: Tracing Western Civilization

During this semester's trip to Greece, UD's Romers toured the ruins of one of history's most famous military engagements -- the Battle of Marathon -- dating back to 490 B.C. The trip marked the first visit to Marathon in decades for the Rome Program. "Our visit there was long overdue," said Peter Hatlie, vice president, dean, director, and professor of classics on the Rome campus.

+ Read More

UD Welcomes Edward Hadas: Leader in Catholic Social Teaching

In the modern economy, too often our financial system fails drastically, moving from one devastation to another. As part of recent efforts to promote Catholic Social Teaching, UD welcomes Oxford Research Scholar Edward Hadas as he explores the relationships among finance, money, the economy and the human condition. Join us on Monday, Nov. 27, as Hadas presents "Money, Finance and Greed: Solving an Economic Mystery."

+ Read More