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Classical Education Degree Requirements

Classical Education Graduate Program: Degree Requirements 

The Braniff Graduate School of Liberal Arts offers the following Classical Education programs: Certificate of Classical Learning, Master of Humanities with Classical Education Concentration, and Master of Arts in Humanities with Classical Education Concentration. Each of these options includes a required core with additional flexibility in curriculum design so that you can customize a program of study appropriate to your personal, professional, and intellectual goals. Students consult with their academic adviser to map out a program of study.

The following requirements reflect the latest changes that will appear in the 2020-21 Bulletin, and are effective for students starting Fall 2020 or later. Students are subject to the requirements of the version of the Bulletin that was effective during their first term, unless they make other arrangements with the Graduate Director.

Previous version of Classical Education requirements: 2019-20, 2016-19. (See all previous Bulletins here.)

For descriptions of the courses listed here, and the typical two-year schedule of courses, see here.

Master of Arts in Humanities with Classical Education Concentration - 36 credit hours

Required Coursework

Fifteen credit hours of graduate-level courses are required. The following courses comprise the “core” of the Master of Arts in Humanities with Classical Education Concentration. Each course is three credit hours. 

  • Trivium
  • Quadrivium
  • Philosophy of Education
  • Classical Pedagogy, Ancient and Modern
  • One course from the “Great Works” series (Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance/Baroque, Modern)

Elective Coursework

Fifteen credit hours of graduate-level elective courses from across the disciplines may be chosen. These include, but are not limited to, the following courses. Each course is three credit hours. 

  • Courses crafted specifically for our program in classical education, such as Master Teachers in the Western Tradition, History of Liberal Arts Education, Ancient Epics, Plato and Socratic Conversation, Augustine the Teacher, Aquinas on the Virtues, Dante and Education, Existential Fiction, The Inklings, Teaching Great American Speeches, Writing as Imitation, Teaching Classical Children’s Literature, Classical Pedagogy in the Science Classroom, etc.
  • With the graduate director’s approval, students may complete pertinent graduate-level courses from a variety of fields, including art, classics, drama, economics, education, English and other European literary traditions (French, German, Italian, or Spanish), history, politics, psychology, philosophy, and theology.
  • Practicum (apprenticeship) courses: Among their elective credit hours, students may choose to complete up to three practicum courses; students may complete one such three-credit practicum course per semester at a local classical school for a combined total of at most nine credit hours.

Thesis

While completing the thesis, students register for a six-credit thesis course. Well before registering for the course (at least one semester, but preferably two or more), the student must consult with an academic advisor to determine a suitable thesis topic and appropriate criteria, and then begin the research process in earnest. While the six-credit thesis course is completed in one semester, it is expected that the student will do a significant amount of preparatory work on the thesis long before taking this course. For more information, contact your academic advisor.

Foreign Language Requirement

Before beginning the M.A. thesis, the candidate must demonstrate reading competency in either ancient Greek or Latin or modern Italian, French, or German. For any of these languages, the requirement may be met by completing an upper level language course (approved by the graduate director) with a grade of B or above, or by passing an examination in translation. For modern languages, students may fulfill this requirement by passing the two-course, graduate-level “Reading Knowledge” sequence for the language (e.g., Italian for Reading Knowledge I, Italian for Reading Knowledge II).

Comprehensive Exam

Every student must successfully pass a comprehensive exam.

Master of Humanities with Classical Education Concentration - 36 credit hours

Required Coursework

Fifteen credit hours of graduate-level courses are required. The following courses comprise the “core” of the Master of Arts in Humanities with Classical Education Concentration. Each course is three credit hours. 

  • Trivium
  • Quadrivium
  • Philosophy of Education
  • Classical Pedagogy, Ancient and Modern
  • One course from the “Great Works” series (Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance/Baroque, Modern) 

Elective Coursework

Twenty-one credit hours of graduate-level elective courses from across the disciplines may be chosen. These include, but are not limited to, the following courses. Each course is three credit hours. 

  • Courses crafted specifically for our program in classical education, such as Master Teachers in the Western Tradition, History of Liberal Arts Education, Ancient Epics, Plato and Socratic Conversation, Augustine the Teacher, Aquinas on the Virtues, Dante and Education, Existential Fiction, The Inklings, Teaching Great American Speeches, Writing as Imitation, Teaching Classical Children’s Literature, Classical Pedagogy in the Science Classroom, etc.
  • With the graduate director’s approval, students may complete pertinent graduate-level courses from a variety of fields, including art, classics, drama, economics, education, English and other European literary traditions (French, German, Italian, or Spanish), history, politics, psychology, philosophy, and theology.
  • Practicum (apprenticeship) courses: Among their elective credit hours, students may choose to complete up to three practicum courses; students may complete one such three-credit practicum course per semester at a local classical school for a combined total of at most nine credit hours.

Comprehensive Exam

Every student must successfully pass a comprehensive exam.

Certificate in Classical Learning - 18 credit hours

Required Coursework

Nine credit hours of graduate-level courses are required. The following courses comprise the “core” of the Master of Arts in Humanities with Classical Education Concentration. Each course is three credit hours. 

  • Trivium
  • Quadrivium
  • Philosophy of Education

Elective Coursework

Nine credit hours of graduate-level elective courses from across the disciplines may be chosen. These include, but are not limited to, the following courses. Each course is three credit hours. 

  • Courses crafted specifically for our program in classical education, such as Master Teachers in the Western Tradition, History of Liberal Arts Education, Ancient Epics, Plato and Socratic Conversation, Augustine the Teacher, Aquinas on the Virtues, Dante and Education, Existential Fiction, The Inklings, Teaching Great American Speeches, Writing as Imitation, Teaching Classical Children’s Literature, Classical Pedagogy in the Science Classroom, etc.
  • With the graduate director’s approval, students may complete pertinent graduate-level courses from a variety of fields, including art, classics, drama, economics, education, English and other European literary traditions (French, German, Italian, or Spanish), history, politics, psychology, philosophy, and theology.
  • Practicum (apprenticeship) courses: Among their elective credit hours, students may choose to complete up to two practicum courses; students may complete one such three-credit practicum course per semester at a local classical school for a combined total of at most six credit hours.

 

Humanities Graduate Program

The Master of Arts in Humanities with Classical Education Concentration, the Master of Humanities with Classical Education Concentration, and the Certificate of Classical Learning are part of the Humanities Graduate Program. This 36 credit hour degree allows students to design their own personalized curriculum around a core of four special courses devoted to the reading of seminal works of Western thought. To this core, courses are added according to interest, either in one or two concentrations, or in one or two historical periods, for a deep and broad educational foundation.