Classical Education Degree Requirements

Classical Education Graduate Program: Degree Requirements 

The Braniff Graduate School of Liberal Arts offers both the Certificate of Classical Learning and the Master of Humanities or Master of Arts in Humanities with Classical Education Concentration. All options offer a level of flexibility in curriculum design so that you can customize a program of study appropriate to your personal, professional and intellectual goals. Students meet with their academic adviser to map out their program of study.

Master of Arts in Humanities with Classical Education Concentration - 36 credit hours

Required Coursework

12 credit hours of graduate-level courses are required:

    1. Trivium or History of Liberal Education or Principles of Childhood Classical Education
    2. Philosophy of Education
    3. Two courses from the "World Courses" series which cover six historical epochs (Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Modern, Recent). These courses are devoted to the study of major works in the formation of the West. 

Elective Coursework

12-18 credit hours of elective courses can be selected. These may include, but are not limited to the following:

  1. Trivium, History of Liberal Education or Principles of Childhood Classical Education, if not previously selected as a required course 
  2. Pedagogical courses, such as: Writing as Imitation, Teaching American History, Teaching Classical Children’s Literature, etc.
  3. Related courses from such fields as art, classics, drama, economics, education, English, history, human sciences, comparative literary traditions, French, German, Italian, Spanish, philosophy, politics, psychology and theology. A few examples include: Arthurian Literature and Fairy Tales  for K-7 English Teachers, classical language courses and politics or American studies courses such as The Federalist Papers, Lincoln, Aristotle’s Politics, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, Plutarch/Augustine/Machiavelli, etc.

Apprenticeship 

The apprenticeship or "practicum" at a local Classical school comprises an additional 6-12 credit hours of the program curriculum.  

Thesis

The thesis requirement comprises 6 credit hours. Students meet with their academic adviser to determine thesis topic and criteria. 

Foreign Language Requirement

Before beginning the M.A. thesis, the candidate must demonstrate reading competency in Greek, Latin, French or German. The language requirement may be met by completing an upper level language course with a grade of B or better, or by passing an examination in translation.  

Comprehensive Exam

A positive evaluation must be earned for the comprehensive exam.  

Master of Humanities with Classical Education Concentration - 36 credit hours

Required Coursework

12 credit hours of graduate-level courses are required:

    1. Trivium or History of Liberal Education or Principles of Childhood Classical Education
    2. Philosophy of Education
    3. Two courses from the "World Courses" series which cover six historical epochs (Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Modern, Recent). These courses are devoted to the study of major works in the formation of the West. 

Elective Coursework

12-18 credit hours of elective courses can be selected. These may include, but are not limited to the following:

  1. Trivium, History of Liberal Education or Principles of Childhood Classical Education, if not previously selected as a required course 
  2. Pedagogical courses, such as: Writing as Imitation, Teaching American History, Teaching Classical Children’s Literature, etc.
  3. Related courses from such fields as art, classics, drama, economics, education, English, history, human sciences, comparative literary traditions, French, German, Italian, Spanish, philosophy, politics, psychology and theology. A few examples include: Arthurian Literature and Fairy Tales  for K-7 English Teachers, classical language courses and politics or American studies courses such as The Federalist Papers, Lincoln, Aristotle’s Politics, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, Plutarch/Augustine/Machiavelli, etc.

Apprenticeship 

The apprenticeship or "practicum" at a local Classical school comprises an additional 6-12 credit hours of the program curriculum.  

Comprehensive Exam

A positive evaluation must be earned for the comprehensive exam.  

Certificate in Classical Learning - 18 credit hours

Required Coursework

12-15 credit hours of graduate-level humanities courses are required. 

Required courses include:

  1. Trivium or History of Liberal Education or Principles of Childhood Classical Education
  2. Philosophy of Education

Elective Coursework

A variety of electives can be selected to augment the recommended courses. These may include :

  1. Courses from the "World Courses" series covering six historical epochs  (Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Modern, Recent). These courses are devoted to the study of major works in the formation of the West.
  2. Pedagogical courses, such as: Writing as Imitation, Teaching Classical Children’s Literature, etc.
  3. Related courses from such fields as art, classics, drama, economics, education, English, history, human sciences, comparative literary traditions, French, German, Italian, Spanish, philosophy, politics, psychology and theology. A few examples include: Arthurian Literature and Fairy Tales for K-7 English Teachers, classical language courses and politics or American studies courses such as The Federalist Papers, Lincoln, Aristotle’s Politics, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, Plutarch/Augustine/Machiavelli, etc.

Apprenticeship

The apprenticeship or "practicum" at a local Classical school comprises an additional 3-6 credit hours of the program curriculum. 

 

Humanities Graduate Program

The Master of Humanities with Classical Education Concentration and the Certificate of Classical Learning are part of the Humanities Graduate Program. This 36 credit hour degree allows students to design their own personalized curriculum around a core of three special courses devoted to the reading of seminal works of Western thought. To this core, courses are added according to interest, either in one or two concentrations, or in one or two historical periods, for a deep and broad educational foundation.  

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