Classical Philology Major

Requirements            |            Suggested Sequence

 

Classical Philology Major Requirements

24 advanced credits

18 of these must be in the chosen major language (Greek or Latin), selected from course offerings at the 3000 level or above. Included in these 18 are:

  • Advanced Grammar and Composition (Greek 3324 or Latin 3324)
  • Junior Paper. (At the end of the junior year the Classics major writes a research paper of 15- 20 pages. The general topic of the paper is determined by the subject of one of the advanced literature courses in the major language for which the student is enrolled during the second semester.)
  • Senior Project: Written and presented orally at the end of the senior year.

The remaining six credits

  • Six additional credits are selected from offerings at the 3000 level or above in the major or second language or, by permission of the program advisor, may be chosen from advanced offerings in literature, politics, philosophy, history, etc. Whenever possible, the Classics faculty will assist the student in doing work in the related field in the appropriate language.

The second language:

  • Latin or Greek must be completed through the intermediate level. Advanced courses are recommended.
  • Reading knowledge of one modern language, preferably German, is determined through an examination administered by the program advisor in consultation with professors in the appropriate language. The student must pass this examination no later than the end of the junior year. Students often choose to take MGE 5311 German For Reading Knowledge or MFR 5311 French For Reading Knowledge to fulfill this requirement.

Junior Paper:

Written at the end of the junior year in association with one of the student's advanced literature courses in his or her major language.

Comprehensive Examination:

There are three parts, written on three different dates. Passing the comprehensive examination is a requirement for graduation.

  1. Ancient History, 2-3 hours.
  2. Philology (includes accurate and literate translation into English, and general knowledge of the vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of your major language), 2-3 hours.
  3. Literary criticism (annotated bibliography).

   

Suggested Sequence for the Major in Classical Philology

The following outline assumes that the student is able to study Latin at the intermediate level in the freshman year. If the student must begin with Latin 1301 or 1305, he or she should plan to take one or more courses during at least one summer session. The outline also assumes that Classical Philology majors will participate in the Rome Program in the spring semester of the sophomore year.

Year I
Fall and Spring (30 credits)
    Latin 2311 Intermediate Latin I: Roman Prose
    Greek 1301 Elementary Greek
    English 1301 Literary Traditions I
    Philosophy 1301 Philosophy and the Ethical Life
    Politics 1311 Principles of American Politics


    Latin 2312 Intermediate Latin II: Roman Prose
    or Economics 1311 Fundamentals of Economics
    Greek 1302 Elementary Greek II
    English 1302 Literary Traditions II
    Theology 1310 Understanding the Bible
    Art, Drama, Math, Music

Year II
Fall and Spring (30 credits) - Spring is typically spent in Rome
    Adv. Major Language
    Greek 2315 Intermediate Greek
    English 2312 Literary Traditions IV
    History 2302 Western Civilization II
    Art, Drama, Math, Music

    English 2311 Literary Traditions III
    History 2301 Western Civilization I
    Theology 2311 Western Theological Tradition
    Philosophy 2323 Philosophy of Man
    Art 2311 Art and Architecture of Rome

Year III
Fall and Spring (32 credits)
    Adv. Major Language
    Philosophy 3311 Philosophy of Being
    Science
    History 1311 American Civilization I
    Elective or Modern Language

    Adv. Major Language
    Science
    History 1312 American Civilization II
    Elective or Modern Language
    Elective

Year IV
Fall and Spring (30 credits)
    Advanced Major Language 3324
    Philosophy 3325 Ancient Philosophy
    or 4335 Philosophy of Language 
    Economics 1311 Fundamentals of Economics or Elective
    Major or Second Language or Related Field/CLC
    Elective or Modern Language

    Adv. Major Language
    Senior Project 4342
    Major or Second Language or Related Field/CLC
    Elective or Modern Language
    Elective

 

 

Background photo: Delphi © 2015 by Rebecca Deitsch, BA '17

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