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Journals of Classics

Share your scholarly work!

If you have an interest in writing and disseminating your writing to more than just your professors and colleagues, consider sending your submissions to one of the following Classics journals:

Aisthesis: The Undergraduate Journal of Classical Studies

Aisthesis: The Undergraduate Journal of Classical Studies seeks submissions from undergraduate authors at any university. Papers are peer-reviewed by a staff of Stanford undergraduates, and the journal is published in both print and online formats. We distribute the journal at Stanford and send it to over 100 other universities to revitalize interest in and spread knowledge of classical subjects and values. Click here for more details.  

Philomathes: A Journal of Undergraduate Research in Classics

Organized by Austin Peay State University, Philomathes promotes excellence in undergraduate research and encourages undergraduate students from all colleges and universities to submit their scholarly work. They seek original research on any topic pertaining to the ancient Greek and Roman world. For more information visit their website.

News

You Can Do What with a (Spanish) Degree?

His first step was to enroll in physician’s assistant school at Baylor’s College of Medicine, a career trajectory to which he had aspired since his early childhood. Nowadays, Jonathan Cunningham, BA ’17, is dedicated to the vocational pursuit of comfort and healing at MD Anderson in Houston, among the largest cancer treatment centers in the U.S., where he was once a chemotherapy patient himself.

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History Alumnus Heads National Catholic Bioethics Center

During his Rome semester in 1991, Joseph Meaney, BA '93, with his friends (now Father) Kevin Cook, BA '94, and (now Texas State Representative and UD Trustee) Tan Parker, BA '93, attended a private Mass with Pope St. John Paul II. Several weeks earlier, they had hand-delivered a letter to the Swiss Guards outside St. Peter's requesting the Mass and including their contact information; at last, they'd received the phone call instructing them to be at the Bronze Gates at 5 a.m.

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