Prospective Students

Prospective Students

Five Ideas That Animate the Study of Literature at UD

  1. We love to read great literature. These courses focus upon primary texts, which we read in their entirety with the conviction that their rich worlds can teach us something.
  2. We view the sequence of great works we read as an ongoing conversation of the most fundamental questions of our nature as human beings, our place in the cosmos, and our relation to the divine. By studying and debating these works, we become part of that conversation.
  3. We are interested in how literary form in particular shapes, reflects, and conveys ideas. Accordingly, lyric poetry is at the heart of our study because it teaches us to notice the details of craft and thought.
  4. We believe that the best way to learn to think critically and to write well is to think and write about the greatest works of literature. For this reason, we do not teach "composition" as a separate course, but as a natural extension of carefully reading the best composed works of our tradition.
  5. By exploring the texts and questions we do, we often transcend disciplinary boundaries by considering the philosophical, political, and theological implications of what we read. In this way, the literary tradition sequence is intrinsically connected to--and in dialogue with--the larger liberal arts and science core curriculum.

News

Iraqi Couple Will Use UD Education to Enrich, Preserve Culture

They came here so that someday, they can go back with even more to offer. Sana Kandalan, MA '19, and Anmar Oghanna, MBA '19, a wife and husband, both received scholarships to pursue graduate education at UD; they hope to use their degrees and experiences here to better serve their community back home in Erbil.

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Trailblazing Golden Crusaders Pave Path for Future Generations

During their freshman year, a mere nine miles from the UD campus, President John F. Kennedy was shot in Dealey Plaza on Nov. 22, 1963. Kennedy's famous words, "Ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man," were imprinted on the memories of these freshmen, influencing the development of their characters and philanthropic spirits and empowering them to serve with distinction in all types of vocations.

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Professor Scott Churchill Explores the Souls of Animals

After happening across the early biophilosopher Jakob von Uexküll as a freshman biology major, Professor of Psychology Scott Churchill began peering into the worlds of animals through what Uexküll called the "spiritual eye" rather than our physical one; there, he discovered the animal spirit.

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