Prospective Students

Prospective Students

Five Ideas That Animate the Study of Literature at UD

  1. We love to read great literature. These courses focus upon primary texts, which we read in their entirety with the conviction that their rich worlds can teach us something.
  2. We view the sequence of great works we read as an ongoing conversation of the most fundamental questions of our nature as human beings, our place in the cosmos, and our relation to the divine. By studying and debating these works, we become part of that conversation.
  3. We are interested in how literary form in particular shapes, reflects, and conveys ideas. Accordingly, lyric poetry is at the heart of our study because it teaches us to notice the details of craft and thought.
  4. We believe that the best way to learn to think critically and to write well is to think and write about the greatest works of literature. For this reason, we do not teach "composition" as a separate course, but as a natural extension of carefully reading the best composed works of our tradition.
  5. By exploring the texts and questions we do, we often transcend disciplinary boundaries by considering the philosophical, political, and theological implications of what we read. In this way, the literary tradition sequence is intrinsically connected to--and in dialogue with--the larger liberal arts and science core curriculum.

News

UD in the Community: Lamberti's Carries On Tradition

Its connection to UD helps the alumnus-owned Lamberti's fulfill its three pillars: local, tradition and famiglia. Lamberti's was the vendor for this year's Groundhog "Party in the Park" celebration; additionally, Lamberti's is looking into carrying Due Santi Rosso wine from UD's own vineyard on the Eugene Constantin Campus.

+ Read More

University of Dallas Dedicates Cardinal Farrell Hall -- Its New 'Front Door'

The University of Dallas community gathered on Friday, Feb. 2, 2018, for the formal blessing and opening of Cardinal Farrell Hall, named after our former bishop of Dallas, previous chancellor and longtime friend of the university, Kevin Cardinal Farrell. The opening of the new student-focused building marks the completion of one of several capital projects, a part of a broader institutional effort to transform the university's Irving campus.

+ Read More

Textile and Ceramic Exhibition Arrives from North Carolina Mountain Range

The Beatrice M. Haggerty Gallery proudly announces the opening of a two-person exhibition, "What Remains," featuring artists Rachel Meginnes and Assistant Professor of Ceramics Kelly O'Briant. The exhibition is curated by Penland Gallery Director Kathryn Gremley of the Penland School of Craft in North Carolina. In 2001, O'Briant received a two-year Core Fellowship from the Penland School of Craft, where Meginnes recently completed a three-year residency.

+ Read More