Legal Studies Concentration

Legal Studies Concentration

The Legal Studies concentration is intended to familiarize students with the applications of law in a broader context. Students will be introduced to constitutional, administrative, civil, and trade law, as well as being given the opportunity to prepare and deliver legal arguments in Moot Court. This concentration may be helpful to some students who intend to pursue a vocation in law, but is by no means a requirement for entry into law school.

Students who are interested in the Legal Studies concentration should contact the program director, Professor David Upham, by phone (972-721-5023) or email (dupham@udallas.edu). 

Requirements for the Concentration

Five courses, including:

  • POL 3323. Constitutional Law
  • POL 3324. Public Policy, or POL 3330. Public Law and Administration.
  • POL 3327. Civil Rights
  • ECO 4340. Law & Economics

 
And one of the following:

  • PHI 5331. Philosophy of Law
  • BUS 3340. Legal Environment
  • Or a substitute approved by the Legal Studies Advisor.


Other requirements:

  • Participation for credit in at least two semester of GST 1122: Moot Court, or completion of an internship appropriate for legal studies. Such internships must be approved in advance by the Legal Studies Advisor, must be for credit, and must follow the process specified in the catalog for receiving academic credit.
  • Regular consultation with the university's Legal Studies advisor.
  • Membership and regular activity in the university's Pre-Law Society.
  • A study of languages, both classical and modern, is also very beneficial to those considering law school. The languages will help students develop the kind of analytical skills they need to succeed on the LSAT exam, will help them to discipline their minds in preparation for legal study, and will (in the case of modern languages especially) provide them with additional tools once they embark upon legal practice.

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